I started writing historical romances on a dare. One day I couldn't find anything new to read and Joy, the love of my life suggested a romance, Jude Deveraux's The Princess. I enjoyed it and started reading more. I realized that most of the SF, comedy and mystery books I liked had a romance in it: the Dorsai series, the four volume Man of his Word fantasy series, The Sebasitan St. Cyr series, The Dog Tails, even P.G.Woodhouse's Leave it to Psmith and Richard Powell's comedy Don Quixote, U.S.A. I have been a Napoleonic enthusiast since I was young, so the Regency period appealed to me.

I read a few excruciatingly bad romances, amazed that they'd been published. So one day, I said, "I can write better than this" as I flung one such book in the trash. Joy gave me that look of hers. "So, why don't you?" The rest is history...romances. I found the Romance genre quite a challenge. There is a lot more to them than flowery words and kissing. Who knew?

I chose the time travel romances because it allows me to show the contrasts between time periods in a way a straight-forward historical can't. So much of a period's culture is common knowledge and often unconscious. No one would think to describe or discuss universally shared beliefs and information. It is rather unnatural to have characters discuss such things. But put some one in that culture from another era and contrasts and culture shock ensue. I find it a lot of fun, though I enjoy writing historical and contemporary romances too. I also chose time travel stories because of a personal frustration of mine. In too many novels, the time traveler realizes they have traveled in time one page after it happens and accepts the fact in the next paragraph. A lot of history and fun is missed. I try for a more realistic approach.

I write because it is fun, hard work to be sure, but enjoyable. My wife provides a lot of inspiration. My goal is a simple one: Provide an entertaining reading experience.